OECD: Voter Turn-Out

World Rank# Country (no. of elections) vote/VAP%
1 Italy (14) 92.5
4 Iceland (16) 89.5
5 New Zealand (18) 86.2
12 Austria (16) 85.1
13 Belgium (17)* 84.9
15 Netherlands (15) 84.8
16 Australia (21) 84.4
17 Denmark (22) 83.6
18 Sweden (17) 83.3
20 Czech Republic (4) 82.8
23 Portugal (9) 82.4
29 Germany (13) 80.6
30 Slovenia (1) 80.6
33 Greece (17)* 80.3
35 Israel (14) 80.0
37 Norway (14) 79.5
40 Finland (15) 79.0
43 Bulgaria (3) 77.5
45 Romania (2) 77.2
46 Spain (7) 77.0
48 Slovakia (1) 75.9
54 Ireland (16) 74.9
55 United Kingdom (15) 74.9
56 Republic of Korea (9) 74.8
58 Croatia (2) 73.5
59 Turkey (9) 73.5
74 Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (14) 69.1
75 Japan (21) 69.0
77 Canada (17) 68.4
81 France (15) 67.3
82 Liechtenstein (16)* 67.3
85 Ukraine (3) 66.1
91 Hungary (3) 64.1
92 Luxembourg (12) 64.1
97 Latvia (3) 63.1
98 Belarus (1) 63.0
102 Singapore (8) 62.0
106 Georgia (2) 60.6
110 Lithuania (2) 60.1
116 Malaysia (7) 59.0
124 Estonia (3) 56.0
127 Russia (2) 55.0
131 Poland (4) 52.3
138 Switzerland (13)* 49.3
139 USA (26) 48.3
140 Mexico (18) 48.1

Source: International IDEA

Malaysia Health Statistic: HIV, Gonorrhea, Syphilis

Incidence rate (per 100 000 population) of communicable diseases such as:

Year HIV Gonorrhea Infections Syphilis (All Forms)
1999 20.80 10.30 11.70
2000 23.00 6.00 7.70
2001 24.73 5.39 5.98
2002 30.35 3.93 4.36
2003 26.97 3.29 4.27
2004 25.71 3.06 3.84
2005 23.42 2.06 3.44
2006 21.88 1.90 3.06

Source: Ministry of Health Malaysia, Health Fact

MeThink: Malaysian in Stockholm, Sweden

Arrived at Stockholm, Sweden and started working in March. Was wandering if I put the blog post titled “Malaysian in Stockholm, Sweden”, would it help to get some fellow Malaysians to notice me and get in touch with me? 😛 It would be nice to know some fellow Malaysians here and how are they doing in Sweden…

Malaysia Health Statistic: Dengue, Malaria

Incidence rate (per 100 000 population) of communicable diseases such as:

Year Dengue Fever Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Malaria
1999 41.40 2.70 25.90
2000 30.20 1.80 57.20
2001 64.32 3.84 53.22
2002 63.17 7.99 44.91
2003 58.93 2.72 25.28
2004 50.92 2.69 24.56
2005 60.71 3.82 21.31
2006 64.37 4.10 19.87

Source: Ministry of Health Malaysia, Health Fact

Malaysia Health Statistic: Food Poisoning, Tuberculosis, Hepatitis

Incidence rate (per 100 000 population) of communicable diseases such as:

Year Food Poisoning Tuberculosis (All Forms) Viral Hepatitis (All Forms)
1999 15.40 65.60 27.00
2000 36.60 67.80 18.30
2001 29.72 61.76 16.81
2002 28.63 58.60 14.68
2003 26.44 63.29 14.40
2004 23.89 61.60 11.69
2005 17.76 61.20 9.77
2006 26.04 62.56 9.37

Source: Ministry of Health Malaysia, Health Fact

Malaysia Health Statistic: Number of Nurse and Ratio

According to statistic from Malaysia Health Ministry, the number of nurse and ratio of population to pharmacists from year 1999 to 2006 are:

a) Total number of nurse:
Year / Number
1999 — 23236
2000 — 31129
2001 — 33295
2002 — 35280
2003 — 36784
2004 — 40220
2005 — 44120
2006 — 47642

b) Population to nurse ratio:
Year / Number
1999 — 977
2000 — 747
2001 — 721
2002 — 695
2003 — 681
2004 — 636
2005 — 592
2006 — 559

Or depicted in graph:

Source: Ministry of Health Malaysia, Health Fact

OECD: Female Students in Tertiary Level Education – 2000 and 2005

From the data found in Statistic Finland – World Figure, the % of females students in tertiary level education for year 2000 and 2005 in OECD and Malaysia are:

Female tertiary students, %
Country / 2000 / 2005
Australia — 54.3 – 54.5
Austria — 51.0 – 53.7
Belgium — 52.3 – 54.4
Canada — 56.0 – NA
China — NA – 46.6
Czech Republic — 49.8 – 52.6
Denmark — 56.9 – 57.4
Finland — 53.7 – 53.6
France — 54.2 – 55.2
Greece — 50.0 – 51.1
Hong Kong — NA – 51.0
Iceland — 61.9 – 64.5
Ireland — 54.1 – 54.9
Italy — 55.5 – 56.6
Japan — 44.9 – 45.9
South Korea — 35.2 – 36.8
Luxembourg — 51.7 – NA
Malaysia — 51.0 – NA
Mexico — 48.7 – 50.3
Netherlands — 50.0 – 51.0
New Zealand — 58.8 – 58.7
Norway — 58.4 – 59.6
Portugal — 56.5 – 55.7
South Africa — 55.3 – 54.6
Spain — 52.9 – 53.7
Sweden — 58.2 – 59.6
Switzerland — 42.6 – 46.0
UK — 53.9 – 57.2
US — 55.8 – 57.2

MeThink: Don’t vote for someone because…

… because “didn’t really grow up there nor did he grow up in Malaysia cos he followed his ambassador dad to Japan and Amerika ’syaitan’ Syarikat and studied in UK’ Jamaluddin.

???

I am not a big fan for Mr. son-in-law, but to say that you should not vote for him because of the reason above appear to me to be almost… funnily sad? I mean should we change the Malaysia constitution law to say that those did not spend the childhood in Malaysia should not contest? Including those who followed the parents who served the country around the globe (which appear to be quite legitimate reason, even though you might not like it)? If this is the case, should we think is it absurd for immigrants like Ayaan Hirsi Ali or Manuela Ramin-Osmundsen to be elected and actually served as cabinet minister in European countries?

I don’t like Mr. son-in-law, and definitely I wouldn’t be voting for him if I have the chance. But to say that voting against him for the reason given above – thanks, but no thanks.

OECD: Tertiary Students Per 100 000 Population, 2000 and 2005

From the data found in Statistic Finland – World Figure, the number of students in tertiary level education per 100 000 population for year 2000 and 2005 in OECD and Malaysia are:

Tertiary Students per 100 000 habitants
Country / 2000 , 2005 ( % of Increment )
Australia — 4416 , 5053 ( 14.42 )
Austria — 3233 , 2986 ( -7.64 )
Belgium — 3471 , 3759 ( 8.30 )
Canada — 3941 , NA
China — 578 , 1633 ( 182.53 )
Czech Republic — 2470 , 3284 ( 32.96 )
Denmark — 3556 , 4276 ( 20.25 )
Finland — 5224 , 5834 ( 11.68 )
France — 3402 , 3606 ( 6.00 )
Germany — 2631 , NA
Greece — 3980 , 6061 ( 52.29 )
Hong Kong — NA , 2207
Iceland — 3465 , 5229 ( 50.91 )
Ireland — 4223 , 4645 ( 9.99 )
Italy — 3077 , 3468 ( 12.71 )
Japan — 3133 , 3169 ( 1.15 )
South Korea — 6072 , 6630 ( 9.19 )
Luxembourg — 558 , NA
Malaysia — 2472 , NA
Mexico — 1985 , 2246 ( 13.15 )
Netherlands — 3074 , 3444 ( 12.04 )
New Zealand — 4552 , 5948 ( 30.67 )
Norway — 4273 , 4658 ( 9.01 )
Portugal — 3731 , 3605 ( -3.38 )
South Africa — 1489 , 1658 ( 11.35 )
Spain — 4583 , 4485 ( -2.14 )
Sweden — 3923 , 4740 ( 20.83 )
Switzerland — 2188 , 2667 ( 21.89 )
UK — 3407 , 3785 ( 11.09 )
US — 4662 , 5840 ( 25.27 )

Malaysia Health Statistic: Number of Pharmacist and Ratio

According to statistic from Malaysia Health Ministry, the number of pharmacist and ratio of population to pharmacists from year 1999 to 2006 are:

a) Total number of pharmacist (private + public)
Year / Number
1999 — 2318
2000 — 2333
2001 — 2567
2002 — 2828
2003 — 3104
2004 — 3506
2005 — 4012
2006 — 4292

b) Population to pharmacist Ratio
Year / Number
1999 — 9798
2000 — 9973
2001 — 9354
2002 — 8673
2003 — 8070
2004 — 7296
2005 — 6512
2006 — 6207

Or depicted in graph:

Source: Ministry of Health Malaysia, Health Fact

Malaysia Health Statistic: Number of Dentists and Ratio

According to statistic from Malaysia Health Ministry, the number of dentist and ratio of population to dentists from year 1999 to 2006 are:

a) Total number of dentist:
Year / Number
1999 — 1909
2000 — 2144
2001 — 2225
2002 — 2297
2003 — 2418
2004 — 2550
2005 — 2751
2006 — 2940

b Population to dentist ratio:
Year / Number
1999 — 11897
2000 — 10852
2001 — 10792
2002 — 10678
2003 — 10359
2004 — 10032
2005 — 9498
2006 — 9061

Or depicted in graph:

Source: Ministry of Health Malaysia, Health Fact

Malaysia Survey 2007: Trust in Individual

In Asian Barometer survey of Malaysia year 2007, the respondents were asked about their trust level in the different type of individuals:

Trust in individuals Great deal   Quite a lot   Not much   None  Cannot decide  
 Relatives   29.0 47.2 19.8 2.0 2.0
 Neighbors   11.3 54.8 29.2 2.5 2.1
 Other People   4.8 44.5 43.7 3.6 3.4
 Malays   10.8 52.0 29.2 3.0 4.9
 Chinese   4.5 41.2 42.1 7.6 4.4
 Indians   3.9 31.9 42.9 12.9 8.0
 Kadazans/Ibans   3.1 25.4 24.4 6.0 38.5

In general, the high level of trust goes in the order such as the list below:

Trust in individuals High Trust   Low Trust  
 Relatives   76.2 21.8
 Neighbors   66.1 31.7
 Malays   62.8 32.2
 Other People   49.3 47.3
 Chinese   45.7 49.7
 Indians   35.8 55.8
 Kadazans/Ibans   28.5 30.4

On the other note…
* 4.8% agreed that “most people can be trusted”.
* 93.4% agreed that one “must be very careful in dealing with other people”.

Source: Asian Barometer – Bridget Welsh, Ibrahim Suffian, and Andrew Aeria. 2007. Malaysia Country Report. Second Wave of Asian Barometer Survey

Malaysia Survey 2007: Trust in Political Institutions

In Asian Barometer Survey conducted in Malaysia year 2007, the respondents were asked about their trust in the following political institutions:

Political institutions Great deal   Quite a lot   Not much   None  Cannot decide  
 Prime Minister   28.7 47.1 15.8 3.8 3.5
 Judiciary   19.3 44.1 24.2 5.7 5.9
 Parliament   15.9 47.9 21.4 5.4 7.6
 Federal Government   19.8 49.8 19.1 5.1 4.8
 State Government   20.9 48.7 20.4 4.7 4.4
 State Assembly   15.2 48.0 21.1 6.6 7.5
 Political Parties   10.8 41.6 29.0 8.0 9.1
 National Front   21.5 45.2 20.6 7.2 4.4
 Opposition Parties   5.7 36.2 37.4 12.4 7.1
 Civil Service   17.5 54.6 19.0 4.7 3.4
 Local Council   16.3 54.2 19.9 4.8 3.9
 Military   27.5 48.8 11.5 3.6 8.0
 Police   18.3 40.6 26.8 12.2 2.1
 Election Commission   16.2 44.8 24.0 6.6 7.0

In general, the level of high trust /low trust goes with the rank like the list below:

Political institutions High Trust   Low Trust  
 Military   76.3 15.1
 Prime Minister   75.8 19.6
 Civil Service   72.1 23.7
 Local Council   70.5 24.7
 Federal Government   69.6 24.2
 State Government   69.6 25.1
 National Front   66.7 27.8
 Parliament   63.8 26.8
 Judiciary   63.4 29.9
 State Assembly   63.2 27.7
 Election Commission   61.0 30.6
 Police   58.9 39.0
 Political Parties   52.4 37.0
 Opposition Parties   41.9 49.8

Source: Asian Barometer – Bridget Welsh, Ibrahim Suffian, and Andrew Aeria. 2007. Malaysia Country Report. Second Wave of Asian Barometer Survey

Malaysia Survey 2007: Perceptions on Income/Economic Condition

In Asian Barometer Survey conducted in Malaysia year 2007, the respondents reported their perceptions on their income and assessment on economic conditions:

a. Income perceptions:
Income covers well, can save – 20.1%
Covers well, no difficulties – 37.3%
Does not cover well – 32.3%
Does not cover, great difficulties – 8.6%
Decline to answer – 1.7%

b. Economic conditions in Malaysia:
i. Individual :-
Very good – 6.7%
Good – 34.5%
So-so – 41.2%
Bad – 11.2%
Very bad – 4.7%

ii. Family :-
Very good – 4.5%
Good – 30.4%
So-so – 58.0%
Bad – 5.4%
Very bad – 1.5%

c. Assessment of past and future economic conditions:

Economic conditions assessment  Individual    Family  
 Past    Future    Past    Future  
 Much Better   16.4 21.8 14.6 23.8
 Little Better   35.9 34 37.6 37.1
 About Same   26.9 20.1 32.8 23.2
 Little Worse   15.4 8.6 12.3 4.1
 Much Worse   4.5 4.4 2.3 0.6
 Can’t choose   0.7 10.8 0.2 10.7
 Decline Answer   0.2 0.3 0.2 0.6

On top of that…
* 53.4% respondents own landline phone.
* 86.4% respondents own handphone.
* 73.2% respondents own car

Source: Asian Barometer – Bridget Welsh, Ibrahim Suffian, and Andrew Aeria. 2007. Malaysia Country Report. Second Wave of Asian Barometer Survey 

Malaysia Survey 2007: Religious Profile

Via Asian Barometer, I found the interesting survey which is similar to the series of European Social Survey I have published in this blog previously. First before looking into the religious profile of 1200 Malaysians interviewed in this survey, let’s look at the ethnic and gender profile of respondents :

Female: 49.5%
Male: 50.5%

Indian/Other, Female: 4.3%
Indian/Other, Male: 4.1%
Non-Malay Bumi, Female: 6.5%
Non-Malay Bumi, Male: 6.3%
Chinese, Female: 13.4%
Chinese, Male: 14.2%
Malay, Female: 25.3%
Malay, Male: 25.9%
Total – 100%

So, the religiosity of Malaysians:
a. Religious profile:
1. Islam – 59.0%
2. Buddhism – 16.1%
3. Christianity – 11.0%
4. Hinduism – 6.7%
5. Taoism – 3.9%
6. Sikhism – 0.2%
7. Confucianism – 0.2%
8. Bahai – 0.2%
9. Animism – 0.3%
10.  None/Other – 2.5%

b. Religious practise:
1. Several times a day – 60.9%
2. Daily – 6.6%
3. Several times a week – 6.5%
4. Once a month – 7.8%
5. Only during festivals – 2.1%
6. Once a year – 7.6%
7. Less often – 4.8%
8. Practically never – 3.4%
9. Decline to answer – 0.9%

Source: Asian Barometer – Bridget Welsh, Ibrahim Suffian, and Andrew Aeria. 2007. Malaysia Country Report. Second Wave of Asian Barometer Survey

Malaysia Health Statistic: Number of Doctors and Ratio

According to statistic from Malaysia Health Ministry, the number of doctors and ratio of population to doctors from year 1999 to 2006 are:

a) Total number of doctors (private + public)
Year / Number
1999 — 15503
2000 — 15619
2001 — 16146
2002 — 17442
2003 — 18191
2004 — 18246
2005 — 20105
2006 — 21937

b) Population to Doctor Ratio
Year / Number
1999 — 1465
2000 — 1490
2001 — 1487
2002 — 1406
2003 — 1377
2004 — 1402
2005 — 1300
2006 — 1214

Or depicted in graph:

Source: Ministry of Health Malaysia, Health Fact

Picture: Ice Cream Waffle

In Cameron Highland, taste yummy!

Picture: Daisies at Cameron Highland

A little bit out of focus, but the result is not that bad at all…

Picture: Orchid in Rose Garden

The beautiful yellow.

Picture: Cosmos in Cameron Highland

Lovely flower…

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