Death Cases by Skin Cancer: Sweden

Death caused by C43-C44 Melanoma and other malignant neoplasms of skin in Sweden from year 1997 to 2005:

Year Men Woman Both sexes
1997 248 161 409
1998 238 165 403
1999 232 150 382
2000 251 173 424
2001 240 204 444
2002 270 172 442
2003 259 195 454
2004 236 202 438
2005 290 207 497

Source: Statistics Sweden

Death Cases by Skin Cancer: Norway

Death caused by C43-C44 Melanoma and other malignant neoplasms of skin in Norway from year 1970 to 2005:

Year Male Female Total
1970 65 42 107
1971 55 38 93
1972 52 33 85
1973 66 31 97
1974 68 44 112
1975 59 46 105
1976 77 44 121
1977 82 52 134
1978 54 42 96
1979 75 48 123
1980 59 55 114
1981 77 71 148
1982 96 49 145
1983 87 66 153
1984 86 64 150
1985 102 75 177
1986 97 76 173
1987 94 75 169
1988 102 60 162
1989 94 79 173
1990 118 77 195
1991 94 85 179
1992 125 68 193
1993 114 87 201
1994 129 88 217
1995 105 88 193
1996 114 87 201
1997 120 86 206
1998 116 78 194
1999 118 86 204
2000 147 66 213
2001 137 90 227
2002 130 82 212
2003 132 111 243
2004 143 123 266
2005 172 121 293

Sources: Statistic Norway

Death Cases by Skin Cancer: Finland

Death caused by C43-C44 Melanoma and other malignant neoplasms of skin in Finland from year 1970 to 2005:

Year Males Females Total
1970 47 35 82
1971 40 40 80
1972 54 41 95
1973 49 37 86
1974 44 33 77
1975 50 48 98
1976 52 47 99
1977 60 32 92
1978 47 36 83
1979 53 41 94
1980 40 47 87
1981 57 36 93
1982 62 56 118
1983 42 51 93
1984 70 48 118
1985 66 44 110
1986 64 55 119
1987 67 54 121
1988 73 56 129
1989 55 59 114
1990 64 53 117
1991 72 54 126
1992 70 64 134
1993 84 60 144
1994 82 57 139
1995 93 58 151
1996 68 46 114
1997 74 68 142
1998 85 65 150
1999 78 54 132
2000 80 58 138
2001 86 67 153
2002 85 72 157
2003 95 58 153
2004 84 60 144
2005 112 62 174

Source: Statistic Finland

MeThink: Unprotected Sex among Swedish Teen

From WHO report, according to the Local:

Not only are 15-year-old Swedish girls more likely to have sex than their peers in other countries, but they are also far more likely to do so unprotected.
Lily Eriksson of the Swedish National Institute of Public Health (SNIPH), the agency responsible for compiling the Swedish statistics, believes that Sweden could do more to stress the dangers of sexually transmitted diseases.
“Even though we have a very good sex education curriculum, there hasn’t been as much emphasis on the dangers of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases,” she told The Local.
Nearly 40 percent of 15-year-old girls in Sweden failed to use a condom the last time they had sex, compared with the overall average of 28 percent. Only girls from Romania reported using condoms less often. In contrast, only 5 percent of girls from top ranked Spain said they didn’t use a condom.
And statistics for Swedish boys aren’t much better, with 31 percent saying they last had intercourse without a condom, compared to an average of 19 percent. Only boys in Slovakia were more likely to have unprotected sex.

Well, this is not so good news for some people, but the explaination given was even worse…

Erikssson thinks that part of the explanation lies with Sweden’s relatively relaxed attitudes toward sex.
“We have a very open and liberal attitude about sex and talking about sex here in Sweden and I think that as a result, Swedish young people probably answer questions about their sexual habits a bit more truthfully than youngsters in other countries,” she said.

WHAT? So she means that because others lied and therefore Sweden’s number look bad? It has REALLY nothing to do with 40% 15-year-old teenage girls and 31% boys are not practising safe sex despite having a good sex education? … I mean I am not surprised the number is high here because during Durex Sex survey, the same high number of unprotected sex with new partner was observed among the adult Swedish too: >70% in year 2005.
Well, probably she should work hard to convince the other teenage around the developed countries to be more truthful about their sex life and then only realise it is not an issue afterall (since everyone is having the same problem)?

Sigh…

Death Cases by Skin Cancer: Denmark

Death caused by C43-C44 Melanoma and other malignant neoplasms of skin in Denmark from year 1981 to 2005:

Year Men Women Total
1981 129 97 226
1982 124 113 237
1983 146 110 256
1984 162 106 268
1985 95 98 193
1986 150 137 287
1987 135 95 230
1988 172 139 311
1989 172 151 323
1990 168 137 305
1991 146 125 271
1992 152 122 274
1993 140 129 269
1994 145 128 273
1995 150 135 285
1996 153 117 270
1997 142 118 260
1998 152 108 260
1999 168 132 300
2000 146 142 288
2001 179 135 314
2005 163 139 302

Source: Statistic Denmark

Picture: In the heart of Peony

Love the vibrant colours of this 🙂

MeThink: 140 000 Hits!

10-06-2007: 10 000 hits.
04-09-2007: 20 000 hits.
21-10-2007: 30 000 hits.
25-11-2007: 40 000 hits.
25-12-2007: 50 000 hits.
27-01-2008: 60 000 hits.
21-02-2008: 70 000 hits.
11-03-2008: 80 000 hits.
28-03-2008: 90 000 hits.
14-04-2008: 100 000 hits.
30-04-2008: 110 000 hits.
18-05-2008: 120 000 hits.
03-06-2008: 130 000 hits.
25-06-2008: 140 000 hits!!!!

Weekly Highlight: 24.06.2008

Denmark:

More find work after loss of social security
24.06.2008

New rules introduced last year have forced more people into finding work after they lost their right to social security
A third of social security recipients, who lost their right to payments after a rule change, have now found work. Another 45 percent who lost their benefits are currently job seeking, according to a new study from the National Centre for Social Research and the Institute of Governmental Research.
The social security rules for married couples changed in April 2007. Couples where both partners were receiving social security payments had to have 300 hours of employment in the past two years, or risk one of them losing their benefits.
The new rule hit many immigrant families hard, with people born outside of Denmark making up 95 percent of those who lost their payments. Almost 700 people have lost their right to social security since last year.
However, the researchers feel that the rule change has helped some immigrant women to look for work outside of the home.
‘Many have been cut off from the workplace because of cultural reasons, but not all have chosen it to be so. For some immigrant women the 300-hours rule has been an argument that they can use over their partner,’ said Kræn Blume Jensen from the Institute of Governmental Research.
Even though a third of those affected have now found work some feel that the other two thirds are being abandoned by the social system, especially those who cannot work the 300 hours due to ill health.
‘Social politics in Denmark has always helped those who have been sick and unable to work. With the 300-hours rule, we are doing the opposite and pulling the economic security net from beneath them,’ said Bettina Post from the Association of Social Workers to public broadcaster DR.
The consequences for families where social security payments are taken away from one person, who is already unable to work, can be very serious. Over half had to borrow money from family and friends.
‘They don’t pay, what they can refrain from paying and some are cutting it very close when it comes to affording rent, electricity, gas and phone bills,’ said Henning Bach, a member of the research team to DR. (kr)

Finland:

Shoplifting Hits Record Levels
Published 24.06.2008, 06.50

Police received a record number of reports of incidents of shoplifting last year, writes the newspaper Aamulehti.
According to Aamulehti, police received 45 000 reports of thefts from shops and shoplifting. In addition, large numbers of attempted thefts were handled by shops without involving the authorities.
The value of goods stolen is estimated in excess of one hundred million euros. The most common items taken by shoplifters are perfumes, expensive items of clothing, and electronics goods. Beer is also a favourite with Finnish shoplifters.
The report says that the number of incidents of theft from shops has risen by a quarter over the past decade. A retailers’ association working group is currently considering whether retailers can prevent additional crimes by identifying previous offenders to their colleagues and preventing them from entering shops.

Netherlands:

Paternal leave on political agenda
Tuesday 24 June 2008

MPs will today debate a proposal by green party GroenLinks to increase the statutory paternity leave following the birth of a new baby from two days to two weeks.
MPs are evenly divided on the issue; the ruling Christian Democrats and ChristenUnie are opposed, alongside the Liberals (VVD). The left-of-centre parties and D66 back the plan.
The Volkskrant reports that the nine MPs of the anti-immigration PVV hold the key and are not revealing their voting intentions.
Employers are against the extra leave for new fathers, saying it will cost them € 200m a year.

Norway:

Poor English skills plague politicians, and their listeners
First published: 24 Jun 2008, 11:43

Some top Norwegian politicians speak such poor English that they risk losing influence as they stumble through prepared speeches or try to express themselves to foreigners, claims a professor at the University of Oslo. He thinks it’s downright embarrassing.
Bernt Hagtvedt, a professor of political science at the University of Oslo, is tired of listening to Norwegian politicians speak broken English when addressing foreign audiences.
Hagtvedt is convinced that their lack of English proficiency damages Norway’s effectiveness in putting forth its positions on important international issues.
“When their grammar, nuances and vocabulary are so deficient that it adversely affects understanding, we have a problem,” Hagtvedt told NRK on its national morning radio broadcast.
He claimed that even though children in Norway are taught English in the schools, it’s “a problem that many Norwegians think they are fluent in English,” when they’re not.
“We speak a simple English, with 700-800 words we know,” Hagtvedt said. “And we don’t even try to pronounce them correctly.”
He called Norwegians’ lack of English proficiency “an illustration of a general laziness in Norway. We’re not concerned with standards, and have no interest in striving for anything beyond what we already know.”
Asked whether he gets embarrassed when he hears Norwegian politicians speak, he responded with an immediate “Yes!”
Hagtvedt said it’s “abundantly clear that we must improve knowledge of English in the schools. And we should expect that broadcasters, politicians and other top government officials work on their English.”
Some have. Many, including former cabinet minister Anne Enger Lahnstein when she was in office, have attended language schools in England. And several politicians over the years have exhibited an impressive command of English (former foreign aid minister Hilde Frafjord Johnsen comes to mind) and several other languages as well. Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre, for example, can move seemingly effortlessly from Norwegian to English to French.
Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik was thoroughly embarrassed after he spoke of writing in his “day book” (a literal translation of the Norwegian word for diary, dagbok) after meeting former US President Bill Clinton.
“It’s clear that language is power,” said Hagtvedt. “My simple point is, ‘work on it!’”

Sweden:

Study: Swedish teens ‘more stressed out’ at school
Published: 24 Jun 08 12:19 CET

Swedish 15-year-olds feel more pressure in school than their counterparts in other countries.
In addition, fewer Swedish 15-year-olds say that they like going to school compared with youth elsewhere.

And Swedish young people also report suffering from headaches and feeling down to a greater extent than those of a comparable age in other countries.

The findings come from a study carried out by the World Health Organization (WHO) which looked at the health and well-being of young people in 41 industrialized countries.

The Swedish study included in the report was presented by the Swedish National Institute of Public Health (SNIPH) two years ago.

The comparison shows that Swedish children feel rather well overall, but the situation for 15-year-olds deviates from the pattern, which is a cause for concern.

“It is to a large extent the 15-year-old girls which report that being stressed out and not feeling well. The situation looks similar in other countries. One explanation could be that the girls feel greater demands on them to do their schoolwork, while at the same time feeling the pressure of demands on their appearance and demands that they maintain their social relationships,” said Lilly Eriksson, an investigator with SNIPH.

“The study shows that younger Swedish children feel better than the average of similar aged children in other countries. Swedish 11-year-olds are clearly better than the average in other countries and 13-year-olds are also in good shape,” said Eriksson.

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: UK

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in UK from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 1551 ( 54.6 )
1998 — 1507 ( 50.7 )
1999 — 1354 ( 43.4 )
2000 — 1449 ( 44.7 )
2001 — 1463 ( 35.2 )
2002 — 1980 ( 33.5 )
2003 — 2151 ( 31.2 )
2004 — 2229 ( 30.9 )
2005 — 2786 ( 33.0 )
2006 — 2597 ( 29.1 )

Year : Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 979 ( 34.4 )
1998 — 1122 ( 37.8 )
1999 — 1473 ( 47.2 )
2000 — 1708 ( 52.7 )
2001 — 2247 ( 54.1 )
2002 — 3469 ( 58.6 )
2003 — 4247 ( 61.5 )
2004 — 4331 ( 60.1 )
2005 — 4697 ( 55.7 )
2006 — 4514 ( 50.6 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: Switzerland

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in Switzerland from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 137 ( 16.2 )
1998 — 114 ( 18.5 )
1999 — 111 ( 17.7 )
2000 — 107 ( 18.3 )
2001 — 101 ( 16.1 )
2002 — 134 ( 17.8 )
2003 — 143 ( 18.5 )
2004 — 177 ( 22.8 )
2005 — 225 ( 31.5 )
2006 — 237 ( 31.3 )

Year : Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 270 ( 31.9 )
1998 — 226 ( 36.6 )
1999 — 238 ( 38.0 )
2000 — 231 ( 39.5 )
2001 — 234 ( 37.3 )
2002 — 324 ( 43.1 )
2003 — 404 ( 52.3 )
2004 — 436 ( 56.2 )
2005 — 358 ( 50.1 )
2006 — 304 ( 40.2 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

MeThink: My Graph in Swivel

Well, definitely it is a pleasant surprise for me to note that my graph/data on Malaysia traffic accidents was put in the frontpage of Swivel:

You also can check out more of my data from my user profile 😛

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: Sweden

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in Sweden from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 77 ( 32.2 )
1998 — 89 ( 35.7 )
1999 — 59 ( 28.0 )
2000 — 73 ( 30.2 )
2001 — 67 ( 24.8 )
2002 — 68 ( 24.5 )
2003 — 78 ( 21.5 )
2004 — 83 ( 19.3 )
2005 — 98 ( 25.1 )
2006 — 94 ( 24.9 )

Year : Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 113 ( 47.3 )
1998 — 120 ( 48.2 )
1999 — 113 ( 53.6 )
2000 — 123 ( 50.8 )
2001 — 142 ( 52.6 )
2002 — 152 ( 54.7 )
2003 — 207 ( 57.0 )
2004 — 262 ( 60.8 )
2005 — 195 ( 49.9 )
2006 — 198 ( 52.5 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: Norway

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in Norway from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 34 ( 29.1 )
1998 — 29 ( 28.7 )
1999 — 33 ( 23.9 )
2000 — 32 ( 19.2 )
2001 — 37 ( 23.0 )
2002 — 33 ( 16.2 )
2003 — 51 ( 22.9 )
2004 — 77 ( 28.3 )
2005 — 51 ( 25.4 )
2006 — 88 ( 32.5 )

Year : Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 64 ( 54.7 )
1998 — 62 ( 61.4 )
1999 — 88 ( 63.8 )
2000 — 123 ( 73.7 )
2001 — 112 ( 69.6 )
2002 — 150 ( 73.5 )
2003 — 149 ( 66.8 )
2004 — 168 ( 61.8 )
2005 — 128 ( 63.7 )
2006 — 158 ( 58.3 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: Ireland

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in Ireland from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 37 ( 33.6 )
1998 — 37 ( 30.8 )
1999 — 39 ( 20.5 )
2000 — 72 ( 24.8 )
2001 — 73 ( 24.4 )
2002 — 46 ( 12.6 )
2003 — 75 ( 18.8 )
2004 — 64 ( 18.0 )
2005 — 57 ( 17.9 )
2006 — 83 ( 24.6 )

Year : Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 40 ( 36.4 )
1998 — 41 ( 34.2 )
1999 — 49 ( 25.8 )
2000 — 123 ( 42.4 )
2001 — 166 ( 55.5 )
2002 — 231 ( 63.5 )
2003 — 223 ( 55.9 )
2004 — 178 ( 50.0 )
2005 — 168 ( 52.8 )
2006 — 169 ( 50.1 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

Weekly Highlight: 17.06.2008

Denmark:

Foreign students working more than studying
16.06.2008 
 
Foreign students are foregoing agreed educational courses in favour of work.
The Education Ministry is concerned that young people from foreign countries are using educational stays in Denmark as a pretence to find work in Denmark.
Education Minister Bertel Haarder told Politiken newspaper that his ministry and the Immigration Service are beginning to investigate charges that students are working more than they are studying.
The two organisations are currently carrying out 600 spot checks on different educational institutions to see if the students are attending their classes.
‘The foreign students must attend to their studies, otherwise they have received their residence permits under false pretences,’ said Haarder.
The number of non-EU students in Denmark increased from 5,043 in 2006 to 6,031 in 2007, and many of these students are working so much that they do not have time for their studies, according to Politiken.
One of the schools under investigation is the Selandia school in Slagelse. One teacher there said students who do attend are often asleep because they come straight from working night shifts. In the latest class of foreign students from Selandia to take an exam, only four out of 39 passed. Selandia does not impose compulsory attendance on its students.
Haarder said that the schools have a responsibility to their students to make sure that they attend to their studies, regardless of whether attendance is compulsory.
‘It is unacceptable if an educational institution thinks it can just admit students, demand money from them and not care if they attend their classes or fail exams. In that case we will strip them of their right to offer educational programs.’
International students from the EU/EEA can work unlimited hours while studying. Other foreign students can work a maximum of 15 hours per week during school term and full-time during the summer months. (kr)

Finland:

Young Finns Are Indifferent Voters
Published 17.06.2008, 11.19

The generation of Finns born during or after the 1970s exercises the right to vote significantly less often than their older countrymen. A new doctoral dissertation sees it as a permanent trend.
Traditionally, younger voters are less likely to be active at the polls than their elders. According to Hanna Wass, the author of a doctoral dissertation released on Tuesday, there are a number of reasons for the politically passive behaviour of younger voters.
“They have gone through their social upbringing and grown up at a time when voting was in decline even among older voters. They got a message that voting is no longer all that important,” says Wass.

No longer seen as a duty

Unlike their elders, the younger generation doesn’t see voting as a civic duty. As they grow older, they are not becoming more active voters. The decision not to exercise the right to vote is a relatively permanent one.
As actively voting generations are replaced by less active generations, the fall in voter turnout is expected to continue.
Staying away from the polls can easily become a vicious circle. The young feel that issues important to them are ignored in elections, and by not voting they may be ensuring that their interests continue to be ignored.
There is a danger that growing numbers of the young become politically passive and shut out of the political decision-making process. Hanna Wass believes that active voting by the young could be increased by making the political playing field more attractive.
“Politics and participation in society should be spoken of a lot and in the most interesting way possible. The young should be given the opportunity to experience really making a difference. Election campaigns should also bring up issues of real interest to the young,” says Hanna Wass.

Netherlands: you mean the others are not?

Millions on performance-related pay
Tuesday 17 June 2008

Some two million Dutch workers now have some sort of performance-related pay, according to research for the FNV-affiliated general workers union.
Most get the extra cash in the form of a bonus or a 13th month’s salary. Chemical and food industry workers get the biggest bonuses, says the research quoted in De Pers.

Norway:

Thousands more cops needed
First published: 16 Jun 2008, 12:38

Noway is going to need nearly 4,000 more police officers over the next decade, to keep up with population growth and a rising crime rate.
Police Director Ingelin Killengreen was due to deliver a report on staffing needs to the Justice Ministry on Monday. In it, she notes that Norway’s population is expected to grow not least through immigration, and that poses new challenges.
There are now 460,000 immigrants living in Norway, mostly from Sweden and other European countries but also from the Americas, Asia and Africa. The total number of immigrants in Norway is expected to rise to 1,050,000 by 2020, with two-thirds coming from western nations and one third from eastern European nations and developing countries.
Since the police handle immigration cases on behalf of the immigration agency, more staffing will be needed. It also will be needed to tackle a rising crime rate and ongoing domestic migration from the countryside to the cities.
“We must be prepared to receive immigrants in a way that also will help prevent crime better than we manage today,” Killengreen said. “We need more police with immigrant background themselves, and experts with more insight into foreign cultures.”
Killengreen wants 2,700 more police officers in uniform and 1,000 plainclothes cops on the beat. Justice Minister Knut Storberget welcome the police report and called the needs a “sober and realistic analysis” of crime in Norway and how to deal with it.

Sweden:

Swedish rape stats rise
Published: 16 Jun 08 14:50 CET

The number of reported rapes in Sweden has risen sharply in the last ten years, according to a new survey by Brå, the Swedish national council for crime prevention.
The report highlights other interesting statistics about the changing face of rape crime in Sweden.
Victims and rapists are less likely to know each other well and there have been less so-called random attack rapes in the last ten years.
The number of reported rapes on people over the age of 15 years has doubled since ten years ago. Around 3,500 rapes were reported in 2007.
According to the crime prevention council, rapes reported most occurred between people of no or little acquaintance. This type of rape has risen by 10 percent between 1996 and 2006.
“Rape is one of the most violating crimes against a person. The last decade has seen strong opinions voiced against men’s violence towards women, and the law regarding sexual offences has been reworked several times.
“A change in the law also means that many more of the more minor sexual assaults are now considered a crime and are being reported. As a result, more rapes are reported, which is positive”, said Jan Andersson, director general of Brå in a statement.
The law was changed in 2005 so that criminal actions that had once been classified as sexual assault or sexual abuse are now judged as rape. This also goes some way toward explaining the rise in rape statistics.
Reported rapes where the parties concerned don’t know each other often occur in a private home which doesn’t belong to either victim or rapist. The growing prevalence of this type of rape is not only due to an increase in reported rapes, but also to a change in people’s lifestyles.
According to Klara Hradilova Selin of Brå, it should also be taken into account that “a more active night life and a flurry of internet dating websites enable contacts, often for purely sexual reasons”.
The number of random rape attacks by a stranger has diminished to just one in ten. And whilst fewer people are seriously injured during rape, more victims seek medical care afterwards.
The stats for rapes between people in a close relation has diminished by 12 percent and make up 17 percent of all reported rapes. However, these type of rapes are usually not reported because the victims are often in an abusive relationship and do not dare to report the crime.
There has been a rise in the number of rapes with several perpetrators, but according to Brå, this is not synonymous with so-called ‘gang-bangs’.
Brå’s definition of group rape assumes that several people are involved, but not necessarily all at the same time or that everyone in the group has committed rape. For example, one person might have been the victim of several assaults in one evening.
“The greatest rise of this type of rape has taken place between 2004 and 2006 and this could be explained by the new legislation which now categorizes minor assaults as rape too”, says Klara Hradilova Selin of Brå.
Brå maintains that the crime of rape is particularly difficult to assess and analyze. Most sex crimes are never discovered because victims feel so violated that they do not dare to report the crime to the police, friends or family.
Brå’s study took a random selection of reported rapes from between the years 2004 and 2006 and compared the data to material from Brå’s earlier study for the years between 1995 and 2000.

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: Greece

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in Greece from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 196 ( 37.8 )
1998 — 232 ( 34.9 )
1999 — 198 ( 16.8 )
2000 — 128 ( 26.0 )
2001 — 124 ( 30.3 )
2002 — 162 ( 40.9 )
2003 — 166 ( 38.1 )
2004 — 172 ( 38.5 )
2005 — 215 ( 38.1 )
2006 — 272 ( 47.8 )

Year : Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 78 ( 15.1 )
1998 — 100 ( 15.1 )
1999 — 119 ( 10.1 )
2000 — 90 ( 18.3 )
2001 — 77 ( 18.8 )
2002 — 109 ( 27.5 )
2003 — 140 ( 32.1 )
2004 — 122 ( 27.3 )
2005 — 183 ( 32.4 )
2006 — 143 ( 25.1 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: Germany

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in Germany from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 762 ( 37.8 )
1998 — 868 ( 39.3 )
1999 — 677 ( 37.9 )
2000 — 648 ( 38.5 )
2001 — 513 ( 39.2 )
2002 — 757 ( 40.5 )
2003 — 822 ( 43.2 )
2004 — 1086 ( 48.5 )
2005 — 1213 ( 49.9 )
2006 — 1412 ( 51.9 )

Year : Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 527 ( 26.2 )
1998 — 679 ( 30.7 )
1999 — 594 ( 33.3 )
2000 — 599 ( 35.6 )
2001 — 480 ( 36.7 )
2002 — 619 ( 33.2 )
2003 — 574 ( 30.2 )
2004 — 621 ( 27.8 )
2005 — 687 ( 28.2 )
2006 — 714 ( 26.3 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: Finland

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in Finland from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 19 ( 26.8 )
1998 — 13 ( 16.3 )
1999 — 12 ( 8.5 )
2000 — 24 ( 16.6 )
2001 — 24 ( 18.9 )
2002 — 38 ( 29.5 )
2003 — 30 ( 22.6 )
2004 — 45 ( 35.2 )
2005 — 32 ( 23.2 )
2006 — 58 ( 29.7 )

Year : Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 42 ( 59.2 )
1998 — 32 ( 40.0 )
1999 — 28 ( 19.7 )
2000 — 43 ( 29.7 )
2001 — 21 ( 16.5 )
2002 — 42 ( 32.6 )
2003 — 55 ( 41.4 )
2004 — 57 ( 44.5 )
2005 — 67 ( 48.6 )
2006 — 92 ( 47.2 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: Denmark

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in Denmark from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 112 ( 38.9 )
1998 — 70 ( 35.2 )
1999 — 94 ( 32.9 )
2000 — 75 ( 29.4 )
2001 — 99 ( 30.8 )
2002 — 94 ( 32.2 )
2003 — 101 ( 39.0 )
2004 — 150 ( 48.7 )
2005 — 127 ( 44.9 )
2006 — 105 ( 42.9 )

Year: Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 122 ( 42.4 )
1998 — 92 ( 46.2 )
1999 — 149 ( 52.1 )
2000 — 137 ( 53.7 )
2001 — 144 ( 44.9 )
2002 — 145 ( 49.7 )
2003 — 122 ( 47.1 )
2004 — 129 ( 41.9 )
2005 — 117 ( 41.3 )
2006 — 121 ( 49.4 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

HIV Transmission By MSM and Heterosexual Contact: Belgium

New HIV infection cases diagnosed by man sex with man (MSM) and heterosexual contact, percentage (%) in Belgium from year 1997 to 2006:

Year : MSM Cases ( % MSM )
1997 — 90 ( 12.9 )
1998 — 94 ( 12.5 )
1999 — 92 ( 11.5 )
2000 — 145 ( 15.2 )
2001 — 129 ( 13.4 )
2002 — 153 ( 15.4 )
2003 — 182 ( 17.3 )
2004 — 199 ( 19.9 )
2005 — 240 ( 22.3 )
2006 — 255 ( 25.6 )

Year : Heterosexual ( % Heterosexual )
1997 — 227 ( 32.4 )
1998 — 263 ( 34.8 )
1999 — 273 ( 34.1 )
2000 — 375 ( 39.4 )
2001 — 313 ( 32.4 )
2002 — 441 ( 44.5 )
2003 — 464 ( 44.1 )
2004 — 447 ( 44.6 )
2005 — 431 ( 40.1 )
2006 — 334 ( 33.6 )

Sources:
1. WHO – European health for all database (HFA-DB)
2. Europe – HIV

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