OECD: Female Students in Tertiary Level Education – 2000 and 2005

From the data found in Statistic Finland – World Figure, the % of females students in tertiary level education for year 2000 and 2005 in OECD and Malaysia are:

Female tertiary students, %
Country / 2000 / 2005
Australia — 54.3 – 54.5
Austria — 51.0 – 53.7
Belgium — 52.3 – 54.4
Canada — 56.0 – NA
China — NA – 46.6
Czech Republic — 49.8 – 52.6
Denmark — 56.9 – 57.4
Finland — 53.7 – 53.6
France — 54.2 – 55.2
Greece — 50.0 – 51.1
Hong Kong — NA – 51.0
Iceland — 61.9 – 64.5
Ireland — 54.1 – 54.9
Italy — 55.5 – 56.6
Japan — 44.9 – 45.9
South Korea — 35.2 – 36.8
Luxembourg — 51.7 – NA
Malaysia — 51.0 – NA
Mexico — 48.7 – 50.3
Netherlands — 50.0 – 51.0
New Zealand — 58.8 – 58.7
Norway — 58.4 – 59.6
Portugal — 56.5 – 55.7
South Africa — 55.3 – 54.6
Spain — 52.9 – 53.7
Sweden — 58.2 – 59.6
Switzerland — 42.6 – 46.0
UK — 53.9 – 57.2
US — 55.8 – 57.2

2 Comments

  1. March 10, 2008 at 1:45 pm

    Japan’s figure looks favorable contrasted with the international image of Japan as a male-dominated society. However, traditionally women leaving high school have been shunted into two-year institutions (women’s junior colleges). This is rapidly changing, though, as more of these two-year colleges become co-educational institutions with four-year programs. Another imbalance in Japan is the low proportion of women entering colleges of science, engineering, technology and medicine. Still, with these qualifications in mind, it is interesting to predict that in another decade there will probably be more young women in tertiary education than young men.

  2. michelle said,

    March 10, 2008 at 4:38 pm

    Yeah, I have the figures which show the low proportion of female in science and technical field, perhaps the lowest among the OECD countries. It will come as next few posts (in few days).


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