OECD: Foreign Students 2005

The market share and number of foreign students who studied in OECD countries in year 2005:

Countries of destinations / Market share %, 2005 ( Total from all countries, 2005 )
United States — 21.65 ( 590167 )
United Kingdom — 11.68 ( 318399 )
Germany — 9.53 ( 259797 )
France — 8.68 ( 236518 )
Australia — 6.49 ( 177034 )
Japan — 4.62 ( 125917 )
Canada — 2.76 ( 75249 )
New Zealand — 2.55 ( 69390 )
Spain — 1.67 ( 45603 )
Belgium — 1.66 ( 45290 )
Italy — 1.65 ( 44921 )
Sweden — 1.44 ( 39298 )
Switzerland — 1.35 ( 36827 )
Austria — 1.27 ( 34484 )
Netherlands — 1.16 ( 31584 )
Czech Republic — 0.68 ( 18522 )
Turkey — 0.67 ( 18166 )
Denmark — 0.64 ( 17430 )
Portugal — 0.62 ( 17010 )
Greece — 0.58 ( 15690 )
Korea — 0.57 ( 15497 )
Hungary — 0.50 ( 13601 )
Norway — 0.49 ( 13400 )
Ireland — 0.47 ( 12889 )
Poland — 0.37 ( 10185 )
Finland — 0.31 ( 8442 )
Mexico — 0.07 ( 1892 )
Slovak Republic — 0.06 ( 1678 )
Luxembourg — 0.02 ( 652 )
Iceland — 0.02 ( 484 )

Source: OECD – Education at a Glance 2007 – Indicator C3: Who studies abroad and where?

1 Comment

  1. March 10, 2008 at 1:53 pm

    Japan would be appear to be a fast riser in this category, but it took two decades to hit the articulated target of 100,000 international students.
    The vast majority of these are from China (70-75%). If you add in S. Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Malaysia, you have almost accounted for 100%.
    Recently the Japanese government has called for 350,000 within the next decade. This is designed to help Japan’s economy overcome looming shortages of skilled workers as well as a shortfall of students in higher education relative to the number of government-allocated slots and the large number of institutions. However, the one problem in this plan is the language barrier. Most of the international students are E. Asian and S.E. Asian, and most come to Japan to study Japanese. Yet much of the so-called globalization and internationalization of higher education is proceeding on the presumption that English will be the common language. Japan needs to resolve the language issues quickly.


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