Malaysia: Homicide Statistic 2002-2005, by State

Another crime breakdown in the look from Minister of Women, Family and Community Development is homicide. Below here show the number of homicide cases reported in each state from year 2002 to 2005:

State 2002 2003 2004 2005
Johor 77 86 77 76
Kedah 12 25 23 19
Kelantan 6 10 8 6
Melaka 14 12 11 16
Negeri Sembilan 21 23 25 24
Pahang 12 19 10 5
Perak 35 37 42 30
Perlis 1 1 3 1
Penang 47 30 58 39
Sabah 77 61 72 70
Sarawak 34 40 41 46
Selangor 117 151 137 112
Trengganu 11 9 4 6
Kuala Lumpur 52 61 54 47

On average, Perlis, Trengganu and Kelantan has the lowest number of homicide cases reported, by absolute number. On the other hand, Selangor has the highest number of murder cases reported, an average of 129.3 cases within the period of 4 years. This is followed by Johor (79.0 cases) and Sabah (70.0 cases). Next let’s move on to the comparison among the state by using the normalized number: homicide cases per million population, for year 2005.

Pahang – 3.5
Kelantan – 4.0
Perlis – 4.5
Trengganu – 5.9
Kedah – 10.3
Perak – 13.3
Sarawak – 19.9
Melaka – 22.4
Selangor – 23.6
Sabah – 23.9
Johor – 24.5
Negeri Sembilan – 25.4
Penang – 26.6
Kuala Lumpur – 30.2

So, Kuala Lumpur is the place which has the highest murder rate (30.2 cases per million people, 1.556 million residents), followed by Penang (26.6 cases) and Negeri Sembilan. On the other hand, Pahang has the lowest number of murder cases per million people, followed by Kelantan and Perlis.

Picture: Suma Summer

Suma 25.08.2007, originally uploaded by micpohling.

Last chance to feel the summer beach here in Japan, at Suma – Suma 25.08.2007

Malaysia: Rape Statistic 2000-2005, by State

Surprisingly I found more on the breakdown of rape statistic according to state, via the website of Minister of Women, Family and Community Development of Malaysia.

State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Johor 194 234 235 312 323 324
Kedah 110 123 132 119 127 163
Kelantan 52 74 70 66 82 90
KualaLumpur 67 97 120 77 116 110
Melaka 43 43 57 67 100 78
NegeriSembilan 59 82 62 69 89 97
Pahang 74 79 79 70 102 84
Perak 91 79 100 118 121 148
Perlis 12 10 13 11 21 26
PulauPinang 61 75 73 70 89 71
Sabah 109 94 115 111 149 156
Sarawak 81 79 77 71 94 117
Selangor 216 269 253 280 294 368
Trengganu 48 48 45 38 58 99

By absolute number, Johor has the highest number of rape cases reported, especially for the recent 3 years: over 300 cases reported per year. On the other hand, Selangor seeing a great jump from 294 cases in year 2004 to 368 cases for year 2005. The lowest number of rape cases reported among the states are: Perlis (average 15.5 cases), Trengganu (average 56.0 cases) and Melaka (64.7 cases). However, base on the different population of each state, it is more meaning to compare the rape cases normalized to population for each state (year 2005), as shown below:

State (rape cases per 100 000 pop.) 

Penang – 4.8
Sarawak – 5.1
Sabah – 5.3
Pahang – 5.9
Kelantan – 6.0
Perak – 6.6
Kuala Lumpur – 7.1
Selangor – 7.8
Kedah – 8.8
Trengganu – 9.7
Negeri Sembilan – 10.3
Johor – 10.4
Melaka – 10.9
Perlis – 11.6

Penang has the lowest number of rape cases per 100 000 pop. among Malaysia’s states, followed by Sabah and Selangor. Despite of having high number of rape cases reported in Selangor, the high population of Selangor 4.736 million could explain the high count of cases as well. On the other hand, small population state like Perlis (224500)  has 11.6 rape cases per 100 000 pop., followed by Melaka 10.9 and Johor 10.4 cases per 100 000 pop. per year.

Picture: Kamogawa Night View

Kamogawa 13.08.2007, originally uploaded by micpohling.

Near our place, Kamogawa 13.08.2007

Today Highlight: 28.08.2007

Norway:

Police urge shorter bar hours
28 Aug 2007, 12:16

Police in Norway’s four largest cities are asking local politicians to order bars to close at 2am, because the vast majority of street violence and vandalism occurs late at night after excessive drinking by the bars’ clientele.
The police also want sales of fast-food to be shortened, in the hopes that rowdy Norwegians will just go home. “It’s our opinion that the framework for peaceful conditions for the public is seriously disturbed by sales- and serving-policies that lead to both over-drinking at a time of night when social control is reduced,” the police wrote in their letter.

Netherlands:

Ex-MPs claim unemployment benefit
Tuesday 28 August 2007

Of the 70 MPs who left parliament after the November election, at least 39 are still claiming wachtgeld – special unemployment benefit for former parliamentarians – according to magazine Intermediair. Ex-MPs are entitled to up to €6,200 a month for up to six years.

Finland:

Boy Fined in YouTube Defamation Case
Published 24.08.2007, 17.35

A fifteen year old youth has been fined by the Nurmes District Court for showing a video of his teacher on the internet YouTube service.The video shown on YouTube, filmed at the school’s May Day festival showed the teacher performing and singing. Attached was a text saying the video was from a mental hospital. The teacher’s name was also mentioned.The court determined the youth was mature enough to understand the consequences of his actions from the teacher’s standpoint within the school environment.

Sweden:

‘One million Swedes’ dependent on state handouts
Published: 28th August 2007 11:16 CET

Every year Statistics Sweden measures the total of all state handouts. These include, for example, sickness benefits, economic assistance and unemployment benefits. The resultant data is then used to calculate the equivalent number of people aged between 20 and 64 who could survive on benefits alone. For 2006, this amounted to 1,022,168 people.

Denmark:

Strict visa laws block tourist billions
27.08.2007

The Integration Ministry is prepared to ease the country’s rigid visa requirements to allow hundreds of thousands of more tourists into the country.
Denmark is losing billions of kroner on would-be tourists who are either denied a visa to enter the country or simply do not apply due to the government’s strict regulations, reported Berlingske Tidende newspaper Monday.
Last year over 60,000 Chinese tourists spent at least one night in Denmark, but tourist organisations and the nation’s tourist advisory board say that number could have been considerably larger if the visa laws were relaxed.
Besides the Chinese, citizens from 134 other countries also need visas to enter Denmark, including all former nations of the former Soviet Union. The integration minister, Rikke Hvilshøj, said she is prepared to loosen certain visa requirements.
According to Statistics Denmark, only 6 percent of all visa applications to Danish embassies worldwide were denied last year. But the rules associated with applying are precisely what keep many foreigners from even applying for a visa to come here, according to both Andersen and Flemming Bruhn of tourist advisory organisation VisitDenmark.

Picture: Kyoto Station

Kyoto Station 25.08.2007, originally uploaded by micpohling.

– Kyoto Station 25.08.2007

MV: Jay Chou – 分裂

One of my favourite,sad song 😦

Malaysia: Road Accidents Statistic 2000-2006

By some quick googling, I found some main road accidents statistic of Malaysia via these 2 reports: here and here.  Below here is the data from year 2000 to 2006:

Year     Population       Vehicle           Road            Road            Road
                                Registered     Accidents      Casualties     Deaths

2000    23263600    10598804     250429         50200         6035
2001    23795300    11302545     265175         50473         5849
2002    24526500    12068144     279711         49552         5891
2003    25048300    12868934     298653         52741         6286
2004    25580000    13828889     326815         54091         6228
2005    26130000    14816407     328264         47012         6200
2006    26640000    15790732     341252         35425         6287

By a quick look, number of road accidents and deaths increase steadily while road casualties (injured + death) fluctuates throughout year 2000 to 2006. However, in order to make the data such as road accidents or road deaths more meaningful and comparative, the data will be normalized against: a) Malaysia population for that year of occurence, b) Total number of vehicle registered. The normalization of these data is shown in the 2 graphs as below:

a) Normalization by population:

From the graph, the number of road accidents per 1000 population increase steadily from 10.8 cases in year 2000 to 12.8 cases, an 18.5% increase. On the other hand, the road casualties per 1000 pop. decreases from 2.16 casualties (2000) to 1.33 casualties (2006). The same downward trend is also seen on road deaths per 100 000 pop.: year 2000 recorded 25.9 road deaths for every 100 000 population and seeing a small decrease to 23.6 deaths per 100 000 pop. in year 2006. Although the road deaths is seeing a decrement over the years, it is also remindful to compare it to OECD countries like here: apparently the road deaths in Malaysia decreasing slowly, but it is not good enough. The closest country which has the same traffic accident fatalities like Malaysia is Greece, by the number 14.6 persons per 100 000 pop.

b) Normalization by vehicle registered:

An increment in overall population does not neccesarily mean there will be more vehicle ownership. However for Malaysia case, vehicle ownership (per 1000 pop.) increase steadily from 492 (2000) to 593 (2006): there are more and more people owning the vehicle. From the graph above, we are seeing the number of road accidents per 1000 vehicles decrease over the years: 56.9 accidents to 39.8 accidents per 1000 vehicle. By superficial look, I am tempted to say that an increase in road vehicle does not neccessarily increase the likelihood of more death caused by road accidents. Another side evidence also pointing into the same direction: the number of registered vehicle increase from 10.6 millions to 15.8 million (2000 to 2006, equivalent to 48.99%) while number of deaths shows small increment – 6035 to 6287 deaths in 206 (+4.18%).

Picture: Kyoto Sunset

Kyoto Sunset 21.08.2007, originally uploaded by micpohling.

This picture was taken on the top floor of Kyoto Station.
– Kyoto Sunset 21.08.2007

OECD and Malaysia: Road Deaths (Traffic Accidents) 2004

Total road deaths due to traffic accident occurred in year 2004, in comparison to Malaysia.

a) Absolute number:

Country Road Deaths
Iceland – 23
Luxembourg – 49
Norway – 257
Denmark – 369
Ireland – 374
France – 375
New Zealand – 435
Sweden – 480
Switzerland – 510
Netherlands – 804
Austria – 878
Belgium – 1163
Portugal – 1294
Australia – 1583
Greece – 1619
Canada – 2725
United Kingdom – 3368
Spain – 4741
Finland – 5530
Italy – 5625
Germany – 5842
Malaysia – 6228
Japan – 8492
United States – 42836

b) Road deaths per million population:

Country Road Deaths
Netherlands – 49.4
Sweden – 53.4
Norway – 56.0
United Kingdom – 56.3
Japan – 66.5
Denmark – 68.3
Switzerland – 69.0
Germany – 70.8
France – 71.7
Australia – 78.7
Iceland – 78.7
Canada – 85.2
Finland – 91.6
Ireland – 91.9
Italy – 97.7
New Zealand – 107.1
Austria – 107.4
Luxembourg – 108.1
Spain – 111.1
Belgium – 111.6
Portugal – 123.2
United States – 145.9
Greece – 146.4
Malaysia – 243.5

(c) Road deaths per 100 000 passenger cars (except *):

Country Road Deaths
Netherlands – 11.5
Sweden – 11.7
United Kingdom – 12.1
Germany – 12.9
Norway – 13.0
Iceland – 13.1
Switzerland – 13.4
Japan – 15.1
Canada – 15.2
France – 16.0
Italy – 16.4*  (passenger cars year 2003)
Luxembourg – 16.7
Finland – 18.5
United States – 18.8
Denmark – 19.3
Austria – 21.4
Portugal – 22.4* (passenger cars year 2002)
Ireland – 23.6
Belgium – 23.9
New Zealand – 25.0* (based on 429 passenger cars per 1000 pop.)
Spain – 25.4
Greece – 39.7
Malaysia – 45.0* (all registered vehicles)

Source:

1. European countries: UNECE, Statistic of Road Traffic Accidents (Europe and North America), 2007.

2. Malaysia: UNESCAP report.

Picture: Kyoto Tower at Night

Kyoto Tower 21.08.2007, originally uploaded by micpohling.

– Kyoto Tower 21.08.2007

MV: Oasis – Wonderwall

OECD: Marriage Stats Comparison (Part II)

Continued from previous post, the absolute number of opposite-sex and same-sex marriage/civil partnership in the following countries are compared.

5) Netherlands:

a) Civil partnership

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex  
1998           1616             3010
1999           1500             1757
2000           1322             1600
2001           2847              530
2002           7774              547
2003           9577              542
2004          10573             583
2005          10699             608

b) Marriage

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex 

2001           79677           2414
2002           83970           1838
2003           78928           1499
2004           72231           1210
2005           71113           1150

c) Total: Civil partnership + marriage

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex      (% Same-sex)

1998           88572           3010           (3.29)
1999           90928           1757           (1.90)
2000           89396           1600           (1.76)
2001           82524           2944           (3.44)
2002           91744           2385           (2.53)
2003           88505           2041           (2.25)
2004           82804           1793           (2.12)
2005           81812           1758           (2.10)

6) New Zealand:

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex   (% of Same Sex
                 Marriage           Marriage        Marriage)

2005           20470           227           (1.10)
2006           21461           348           (1.60)

* Same-sex marriage in New Zealand started on 29th April 2005.

7) Norway:

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex   (% of Same Sex
                 Marriage           Marriage        Marriage)

1993           18741             156           (0.83)
1994           19866             133           (0.67)
1995           20981              98            (0.46)
1996           22478             127           (0.56)
1997           22933             117           (0.51)
1998           22349             115           (0.51)
1999           23456             144           (0.61)
2000           25356             154           (0.60)
2001           22967             185           (0.80)
2002           24069             183           (0.75)
2003           22361             204           (0.90)
2004           22354             192           (0.85)
2005           22392             192           (0.85)

‘8) Sweden:

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex   (% of Same Sex
                 Marriage           Marriage        Marriage)

1995           33642             665           (1.94)
1996           33484             319           (0.94)
1997           32313             262           (0.80)
1998           31598             250           (0.78)
1999           35628             287           (0.80)
2000           39895             357           (0.89)
2001           35778             381           (1.05)
2002           38012             422           (1.10)
2003           39041             497           (1.26)
2004           43088             567           (1.30)
2005           44381             593           (1.32)
2006           45551             660           (1.43)

Picture: Kyoto Tower

Kyoto Tower 21.08.2007, originally uploaded by micpohling.

Kyoto Tower, the landmark of Kyoto.

– Kyoto Tower 21.08.2007

Today Highlight: 23.08.2007

Netherlands: probably there is no bias involved…

Other people’s kids are ‘rude’, says survey
Wednesday 22 August 2007

While most parents are satisfied with the way they are bringing up their children, 75% are irritated by other people’s kids who are ‘rude, anti-social, secretive and disobedient’, according to a survey by J/M magazine.
And while they feel themselves to be good parents, mothers said the biggest mistake they make is that they give in too easily and are not consistent. Fathers said they were sometimes too strict.
Making sure their kids are happy remains parents’ the top priority. But giving children a sense of responsibility and teaching them to be aware of the feelings of others are now nearly as important, says J/M.

*Well, via World Values Survey, soon I will post what the parents (both male and female) think what is the important quality in children. Stay tune.

Finland: you mean, before that they don’t have it?

Warning Pictures on Cigarette Packs
Published 21.08.2007, 09.32

Mandatory pictures indicating the dangers of smoking are to be included on cigarette packages in Finland. The newspaper Kaleva writes that Social Services Minister Paula Risikko will sign a statute ordering the use of the images in the autumn.

Norway: the famous “oil fund”…

Oil fund hits new heights
21 Aug 2007, 10:42

Norway has been awash in “petrokroner” since oil prices started soaring two years ago. Government officials have been stashing most of the money away in a fund meant to sustain the country when its offshore oil reserves eventually run dry.
The fund, formally known as the Government Pension Fund – Global, is still widely known as the “oil fund,” and money invested in it grew by another 3.4 percent during the second quarter, to a dizzying NOK 1.94 trillion, or about USD 327.5 billion.
Its reserves now mean that each Norwegian resident has nearly NOK 400,000 (USD 67 833) saved up in the fund, which aims to meet future social security obligations. Norwegians continue to be taxed heavily as well, meanwhile, and calls are constantly being made for politicians to dip into the fund more often to finance current social services. They generally resist the temptation, even when schools are overcrowded, hospitals have waiting lists and police need more resources.

Sweden: Bill Murray is in trouble in Stockholm, but not due to “Lost in Translation” 😛

Bill Murray seized in Stockholm golf cart caper
Published: 22nd August 2007 12:45 CET

Hollywood star Bill Murray was taken to a police station in Stockholm on Sunday night after being stopped by police while driving a golf cart from an upmarket nightclub to his city centre hotel, Expressen report.
Soon however police asked the American actor to pull over when they suspected that he may have been driving the buggy while under the influence of alcohol.

Denmark: nothing much happen…some tax cut, recruitment of foreign medical doctors etc etc…

German: wanted! For…

Wanted: The Owner of This Dog
August 22, 2007

German police investigating illegal rubbish dumping have released a photo of a striking toy dog found among the garbage in a bid to trace the culprit.
The cheeky looking 50-centimeter white mutt with black spots is dressed in a check jacket and appears to be chomping on a cigar.

* Well, if you know the owner of this toy dog, please inform the police in German. They need your help to crack down the illegal rubbish dumping.

Picture: Playing with Fire!

Kyoto Night 20.08.2007, originally uploaded by micpohling.

Haha, yeah, I did have fun of running around like crazy person with the sparkler. But I am very satisfied with the effect, as seen in the picture above 🙂

MV: Oasis – Stand by Me

Another song that must-sing in Karaoke!

OECD: Marriage Stats Comparison (Part I)

A look at the comparison between opposite-sex and same-sex marriage/civil partnership (absolute number) in the selected countries:

1) Canada:

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex   (% of Same Sex
                 Marriage           Marriage        Marriage)
2000           157395  
2001           146618  
2002           146738  
2003           147391              774               (0.52)
2004           148585  
2005           151047  
2006           149236  

* Statistic for year 2004 onwards is still not available (or rather I could not get it from Statistc Canada yet).

2) Denmark:

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex   (% of Same Sex
                 Marriage           Marriage        Marriage)

1998           34733  
1999           35439               296               (0.83)
2000           38388               308               (0.80)
2001           36567               347               (0.94)
2002           37210               303               (0.81)
2003           35041               320               (0.90)
2004           37711               333               (0.88)
2005           36148               394               (1.08)
2006           36452               400               (1.09)

3) Finland:

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex   (% of Same Sex
                 Marriage           Marriage        Marriage)

2005           29283              200               (0.68)
2006           28236              191               (0.67)

* Same sex marriage in Finland started on March 2002, but I could not find the statistic on Statistic Finland.

4) Iceland:

Year        Opposite Sex     Same Sex   (% of Same Sex
                 Marriage           Marriage        Marriage)

1998           1529                  11                (0.71)
1999           1560                  11                (0.70)
2000           1777                  12                (0.67)
2001           1484                  13                (0.87)
2002           1652                  9                  (0.54)
2003           1532                  13                (0.84)
2004           1515                  20                (1.30)
2005           1659                  13                (0.78)
2006           1681                  20                (1.18)

Picture: Japan’s Scenic View

MIyazu/Amanohashidate 天橋立 12.08.2007, originally uploaded by micpohling.

One of the 3 scenic views in Japan. It is a thin strip of land connects two opposing sides of Miyazu Bay. This sand bar is 3.3km long and covered with about 7000 pine trees.
– Miyazu/Amanohashidate 天橋立 12.08.2007

OECD: Gender vs What is Important in Life

Previously, I made the comparison of the subjects on what is important in life among the OECD countries, such as i) family, friends and leisure time, ii) work, politics, religion. However, this time I am going to compare the opinions based on gender: male vs female.

From World Values Survey, the participants were asked to rank the importance each subject in their life according to the scale: “very important”, “rather important”, “not very important” and “not at all important”. The percentage of male and female participant who agreed that the subject (e.g. family, friends) is “very important” to them are used and compared. The example is shown as below:

Family important in life:

Canada [2000]      Male      Female
Very important      868      945
Rather important      72      30
Not very important      5      3
Not at all important      4       3
———————————————–
Very important (%)  91.46      96.33  (Difference: Male – Female= “-4.87”)*
———————————————–

* There are higher % of female think family is important in their lives compared to male.

Japan [2000]       Male      Female
Very important      585      658
Rather important      37      50
Not very important      5      5
Not at all important    1       0
———————————————–
Very important (%)  93.15      92.29 (Difference: Male – Female= “+0.86”)*
———————————————–

* There are higher % of male in Japan think that family is important in their lives compared to female.

IMHO, to make it a fair comparison between how male and female view each subject is important in their lives, the difference of “% mentioned” between male and female within the same country is used. “+” value means that there are higher % of male responded/affirmed to the question compared to female in that country, and “-” means the otherwise, as shown in the example above.

Subsequently, the subjects like family, friends, leisure time, work, politics, religion and feeling of happiness (% of very happy) are compared between male and female within the same country. The result is shown in the table below:

Overall, the importance of each subject in life is going in the sequence: family > work > friends > leisure time > religion > politics. On these subjects, there are higher % of male think that subjects like work and politics is “very important” compared to female. On the other hand, there are more female think that religion, family, and friends are “very important” to them compared to male.

On one note, I guess I was right to say that female values more on good hour is important in a job because of the family, as mentioned in the earlier post.

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